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Warn Hub Conversion

 

Back on with a clean pair of laytex gloves.  Next, I packed the groove, that sits between the inner and outer bearing cups, with wheel bearing grease.  It takes a goodly amount to fill up that void.


Now, take the inner bearing cone (part #9) , which is usually referred to as the inner bearing, pack it with grease.  Do a good job....these little guys is what will keep your front hubs turning and turning for a LONG, LONG time (we hope).  The gaps between each of the rollers should be packed well with grease.  They make relatively inexpensive bearing packers but I prefer to do it by hand.  Hey, with the disposable gloves, it really only looks like it is messy!
 

Put the inner bearing in the wheel hub.  Fill the cavity of the grease seal (part #9) with grease and set it in place on top of the inner bearing. 


We used a bearing cone from a D44 rear axle shaft (you do have some of those laying around, right, from your last D44 rear shaft bearing replacement?) to help press the seal into place.  I centered the cone on top of the seal and held it firmly in place with both thumbs while Scott gently tapped around its edge with a small ball peen hammer.  He only managed to hit my thumb one time while seating the seal (I guess I should consider myself lucky!)

Next, pack the outer bearing cone (part #6) with grease just as you did the inner bearing.  Again, make sure all of the voids between each roller are completely filled with the grease.  Place the outer bearing into the wheel hub.  Be careful when picking the wheel hub up since there is nothing but a bit of grease keeping that bearing in place until you put on the spindle nut.


Apply a thin film of grease on the spindle shaft.  Carefully slide the wheel hub onto the spindle shank.  Keep your thumbs over the outer bearing so it does not pop out onto the floor.  By the way, I'll mention that on these kind of jobs, I usually lay down a piece of cardboard under the work area.  That way, when the bearing does pop off and drop (to the cardboard), it doesn't end up with dirt and other garage floor stuff stuck in the grease. 


OK....looking good so far....you are almost done with this one.  All you have to do is tighten up the spindle nuts and call it good!  Oh yeah....then you have to go do the other side (I almost forgot).
 

More Hub Conversion

 

 

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