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sPOD and The Source
 

With some more work on the wiring looms, I was able to combine a number of runs together while several others were removed or rerouted.  At this point in time, I have 4 circuits wired.  These include:

ARB compressor

CB and ham radios

Aux tranny cooler fan

110VAC power inverter

The remaining two circuits have a couple of possibilities as to what they will receive.  As I mentioned, I removed the fog lamps and so believe a set of off-road lights will be put in their place.  One circuits will be used for that.  I think I might use the remaining circuit to control my ExtremeAire OBA system.  The jury is still out on that one.....not sure quite yet.

With the output circuits now connected to the terminals, it was time to get some power to The Source.  There are three power cables that must be attached.  Two are connected to +12V and one to ground.  Why two to +12V?  One of them is the main power feed for The Source.  The other is a smaller gauge cable with an in-line fuse that provides power for the control circuits and sPOD. 

I had checked my connections twice (well, maybe 4 or 5 times in some cases) and felt confident that my fire extinguisher that was sitting on the bench should be able to quench the flames of most any electrical fire.  (hey, I'm just kidding)   I hopped into the driver's seat and reached up and flipped the switch for circuit #1.  Since I didn't have anything attached to this, I figured it would be a good test.  Hey, the switch illuminated...and a quick check in the engine compartment indicated no smoke either!  I was off to a great start for sure! 

With an empty circuit fully energized (can you do that?), I flipped the switch for #3.  The ARB compressor came to life and my SwayLOC actuator unlocked itself (yes, I leave the SwayLOC switch turned on so it goes into off-road mode as soon as the compressor pumps up).  OK, circuit #3 was working just fine.  I turned off the compressor and tried the remaining circuits.   Radios checked out OK, tranny fan indicator lit, and the power inverter's red power light glowed softly.  SUCCESS! 

I've managed to do some of the work on my TJ at Troy's shop on my day off (Toys by Troy).  A number of customers circulate through the shop on any given day and I've had the chance to show several of them the sPOD and Source.  All have been quite taken with it. 

Troy met John (Mr. sPOD) at this year's Easter Jeep Safari.  Troy had seen my sPOD and Source before EJS and so when he saw John, he was able to get a Source for a customer's Bronco.  Troy knew I would do the wiring on the Bronco if he asked me so he did.  I snapped a few photos of the before and after to include in this write-up.  As you will see, you can use the Source on more than just TJs.

 

The Bronco's wiring was put together during a short afternoon session so that the vehicle could make it to an off-road run that had to be attended.  Orange wire was the color of the day.

 

Here is the cluster of power relays.  A couple of yards of electrical tape were used to bundle them together.  No sockets were used and there was a LOT of un-insulated terminal lugs on the bottom of the relays.

 

Here was the bank of fuse holders used to protect the various relayed circuits.  Some electrical tape was used to hold them in place. 

So all of this "stuff" was removed from the Bronco by me (hey, since I didn't put it in, I didn't feel bad about taking it out!) on one of my Monday trips to the shop.  I was hoping that someone else might finish it but all of the guys were really nice and left it all for me to finish.  (nice, eah?)

 

Here is the final configuration less a couple of circuits that I wired during the next visit to Troy's.  One of the fab techs made a nice aluminum mounting bracket that bolted to the fender well.  We attached the Source to the bracket and it fit like a glove.  I used solder on terminals with heat shrink for insulation.  The Bronco had a custom switch center in it which performed the same function as the sPOD.  It all came out very nicely and I know the customer was pretty happy with the results, even if the Source cover has a Jeep on it! 


If you get a chance to put one of these in your vehicle, don't pass it up.  It works nicely and gives you an easily managed power distribution center.  I'm looking forward to many years of use from mine. 

Good trails to you and remember to TREADLightly!

 

 

 

 

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