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Suck-down Winch Project
 

I marked the holes (on the support plate) with a transfer punch and then proceeded to drill them.  To get the coil spring out of the way, I raised the TJ frame and let the suspension sag.  It also makes it easier to get your fingers in there when it comes time to do the nuts and bolts later on, but it is not necessary. 

 

With the holes drilled in the support plate, Troy spot welded the last two pieces to the mounting plate.  I went through a handful of ideas for attaching the other end of the mounting plate to the spring bucket. 

 

This is what was finally decided on as a workable solution.  It consists of a locating pin and a collar.  The locating pin slips into a hole drilled into the side of the shock tower.  This anchors the corner of the mounting plate and prevents it from lifting up under torque.  The collar will receive a bolt coming through the shock tower which will hold that corner of the mounting plate in place. 

 

A picture of the mounting plate on top of the spring bucket.  The hole for the locating pin was eyeballed and marked with the mounting plate bolted into position.  I then removed the mounting plate and drilled the hole.  I used the collar as a drill guide to make the hole in the shock tower.  While all of the marking and drill was occurring, I made sure that the bolts in the support plate were all tight so I would have proper alignment.

 

For about the 100th time, I attached the winch to the mounting plate using 1" long 5/16" grade 8 hardware.

 

A view of the 2500 pound winch mounted in position.  I discovered earlier that lifting the frame (to let the spring sag out of position) caused "things" to flex a small amount.  While lifted, I had about 1/4" clearance, at the closest point, between the winch body and the inner fender well.  With the full weight of the vehicle back on the suspension, the winch body just touches the inner fender well.  The easiest fix for this was appropriate pressure applied to the offending spot on the fender well.  The most commonly available pressure source for something like this comes in the form of a big hammer.  A few well place whacks took care of the clearance issue. 


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