Stu-Offroad navigation header graphic Advertise here

Click image for more information
Home Steering Electric Bumper/Tires Guards Drivetrain Axles/Shafts Suspension/Brakes Recover Body Other Trips Videos Reviews Guns RC

 

ORO SwayLOC
 

Update 12/31/2006:

A recent SwayLOC thread on JU's TJ forum provided some very good discussion regarding sway bar link lengths and issues that may result from improperly sized and positioned links. 

One point the discussion covered was the possibility of inverting the sway bar when the axle fully droops.  If the links are too short or the arms positioned too low, an arm could rotate down and come up pointing somewhat forward the front of the vehicle while the other arm returns to its normal position once the suspension begins to compress.  That would not be a good thing to have happen. 

 

Here is a pic of my setup with the vehicle on a lift.  My axe is at full droop and at this point, the shocks are limiting the downward travel of the axle.  Note the angle that exists at the point where the arm and the link meet.  If the links were a little shorter, this angle could become nearly straight and so could lead to inverting an arm once the suspension cycled back up to normal ride height.

 

I snagged this pic off of the JU TJ forum....thanks trayson.  He managed to get his TJ all twisted up to see what kind of clearance issues he had.  He runs a WJ steering setup and so his link length is shorter than most.  He positioned his arms a bit higher than I did mine.  With the passenger side tire extremely stuffed and a large percentage of the vehicle's weight bearing down on that wheel, he was able to get the tire to just touch the latch on the arm. 

Not all TJs are the same.  Many after market products are built around/on a stock vehicle.  Many of us don't have stock vehicles (some less stock than others) and so when we install a new upgrade, we may be asking this new upgrade to exist with a previously modified component (such as installing a SwayLOC onto a vehicle with a non-stock steering system or putting a Currie Anti-Rock onto a vehicle with an after market bumper). 

Always take your time and thoroughly check out your mods as best you can once they are installed.  Just don't jump out on the trail and expect everything to work as intended.....you may be in for a big surprise.  Take some time, flex out the suspension (slowly and carefully with a helper observing), check for proper clearances, etc.....it is time well spent and may be money well saved.


 

 

 

Home Steering Electric Bumper/Tires Guards Drivetrain Axles/Shafts Suspension/Brakes Recover Body Other Trips Videos Reviews Guns RC